Show Notes: What To Include?

If you’ve been in the podcasting world for awhile you know what show notes are and you know there are various versions of them. Some people like to include bullet points with time stamps of when certain topics are covered. Other people like transcriptions (which in my opinion are not show notes, they are transcriptions) and yet others want their show notes to be an informative yet enticing marketing piece. I deal in the latter, my show notes are a summary of the show with one or two main points pulled out and shared with the audience. The audience receives valuable content and they also can find out if they want to listen to that particular episode. Of course we always want them to listen to every show so the show notes are meant to entice them to do so. I usually wrap up with a sentence or two about the other topics discussed on the show that are NOT mentioned in the show notes. The idea behind that is to pull the reader in and make them want to download the epi and hear the rest of the show. Here’s an actual break down of a set of show notes I recently did, I’ve made a note next to each section so you can see what I include. It’s up to you if you want to do the same or some variation of this. If you’ve got a shorter podcast you can get away with shorter show notes, fyi. 🙂 This is for episode 377 of The Art of Charm (you can find their episodes here). My comments are...

SEO and Show Notes

This is a topic I'm still exploring. I've found some things that work well and I'll share them here. For starters, if you have a guest who has a wildly popular book or web site or podcast, use that in the title of your show! It'll automatically boost your organic rankings in the search engines so follow this rule when possible. In fact, if their book, web site or podcast is more popular than yours use it as the title as it fits. That's the first tip I have for you. The next tip I have is to hone in on a specific keyword or phrase that you use in every episode of your show. Does the title of your show have a word that you want to highlight? A great example of this is The Solopreneur Hour. In every episode I use the word solopreneur multiple times, always in the first sentence and the last sentence. And now that we're over 289 episodes in, that show is at the TOP of Google when you search for solopreneur. And by top I mean it's all you get on the first few pages of Google! That's the power of search rankings and repurposed content. For more ideas and tips check out this article by Perrin Carrell at the Niche Pursuits web site. Check it out, take some notes and...

Copywriting, Sales Page and Show Notes

One of the reasons my show notes are of such high quality is because of my background experience in journalism, copywriting and storytelling. We're not going to touch on all of those topics in this blog post, that would be far too much content! But we will visit the awesome topic of sales page content and copywriting. And I haven't seen a better breakdown of what and how to write a great sales page than Sean Ogle's article here. Take notes and...
3 Ways To Let a Client Go

3 Ways To Let a Client Go

Let 'Em Go, Let 'Em Go! Yes that's a little play on the Frozen song for you. I apologize, I know it's overplayed but I love it anyway! What I don't love is letting a client go. It isn't fun but sometimes it’s necessary, even in work situations. And there may come a time when you have to part ways with a client. If you are the one doing the letting go, there are a few things to bear in mind. 1.) Be clear about why you are ending the partnership. Think of this a bit like breaking up with someone. The mature thing to do is to explain why you feel the need to leave; you don’t simply stop speaking to someone and hope they get the message…that’s not cool. Honor your own needs and theirs by chatting. 2.) Offer a referral if appropriate. Depending on why you are ending things, consider offering to refer them to someone else. I haven’t done this but I have offered people my Show Notes Made Easy course so they can hire someone else and continue to put out solid show notes. 3.) Keep it on the DL. No bad-mouthing this person within the industry. I’m serious. Whatever industry you're in word gets around. I can tell you that podcasting, at least as of the date I’m typing this, is a close-knit and deeply bonded community. Unless you want yourself blacklisted, keep your trap shut. Even if this person was awful to work with and you can’t tolerate their business (podcast or otherwise), don’t blab about it to anyone in your mutual working sphere....
Boundaries, Boundaries, Boundaries: Gotta Have ‘Em

Boundaries, Boundaries, Boundaries: Gotta Have ‘Em

You Gotta Set Boundaries…Or You’ll Regret It I can’t tell you how important this aspect is. Well, actually I can and I am about to with this blog post! Today is such a 24/7 technology-driven world that it is increasingly difficult to turn off your work and turn on the rest of your life. But you have to do it and you have to do it by setting boundaries. You may be tempted to respond to that email that comes to you at 11pm, but don’t do it. Is that really a precedent you want to set? NO, it’s not. Do you want to be answering emails at 11pm six months from now or 7 years from now? No you don’t. And if you do, you need to get your head checked and this blog post isn’t going to do you any good so you might as well move along. For those of us not needing our heads checked, let’s continue. I understand there will be emergencies that need your attention at inconvenient or abnormal working hours. I’ve been there, absolutely it happens. But don’t let it happen every week or every other week. You may have gotten into this biz for a variety of reasons, and I would hope time flexibility would be one of them. So let’s honor that and actually give you flexibility! Set your hours, set the days you’re going to work and set the turnaround time you need. Be Clear, Like I Mean Crystal Friggin' Clear Yep you gotta convey your availability, your responsibilities and your end of things clearly to your clients, this...

The Value of a Checklist for Podcast Show Notes

The Value of A Checklist or Better Known as the “Crap, Don’t Forget This Stuff Next Time" list One of the most valuable tools in my arsenal is my checklist. When you’re working with multiple podcasters on multiple podcasts, you have to remember who wants which Tweet where and who wants what bolded and where. There are lots of little things to keep track of and it’s your responsibility to do so. I first began this practice with Chris Ducker and his podcast. There were a few minor tweaks I had forgotten more than once - a big no-no in my book - and I wanted to be sure I got it right. I definitely have a “thing” about getting stuff right…it’s my strong suit, but that’s another conversation. Anyway… to make my show notes process as simple and foolproof as possible, I created a checklist for Chris. It worked great with him so I made a checklist for Michael and for my other podcasters. I label mine according to the podcaster and then list all the stuff I need to remember each time I write show notes for that person. I’ll give you some examples: The When, The Where and The Who Of It All For Michael O'Neal and The Solopreneur Hour, I have to remember to create a new category if he has a new guest on and create a new Tweetable based on the topic and the guest's Twitter handle. For Chris Ducker's New Business podcast, I have to remember to put a period at the end of every bullet point (somehow I managed to forget that...

Three Tips for Writing Awesome Bullet Points for Podcast Show Notes

Three Tips for Writing Awesome Sauce Bullet Points! It is a finely-crafted and honed skill good copywriters and show notes writers possess. It’s something I cultivated while in the copywriting biz. And it’s an absolutely powerful tool for your show notes. Why is it so powerful? A few reasons. One being the human eye. It’s drawn to images and it’s drawn to short, concise sentences that stand alone. So two of the most important pieces of your show notes are going to be images and short, concise sentences that stand alone (aka bullet points). We don’t cover images today (and maybe in a future blog post), but we are talking bullet points. So how do you write great bullet points that draw your reader in? Tip #1: The first way is to find other bullet points you like and that have drawn you in, then handwrite those. And I mean handwrite. Go find some paper (it’s that white thing that feels smooth and is blank) and a pen. Don’t get out your Evernote and type these in them, it won’t work. And I’m not making this up. There is science behind this: the human brain remembers and processes things differently if you actually write something versus type it. If you want to use my bullet points, feel free to do so. Otherwise find some you dig and write ‘em. Now you’ll need to do this for a length of time. I’d start with handwriting for 15 minutes a day for the next two weeks. I think you’ll see a difference in the bullets you craft for your own shows!...
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